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Home » What's New » Pediatric Eye Care Questions and Answers with Dr. Scott Lewis

Pediatric Eye Care Questions and Answers with Dr. Scott Lewis

This is the final part of the Q&A on Pediatric Eye Care with Dr. Lewis in Camas and Vancouver WA.

What should I look for when choosing glasses for my child?

The frames should not be too big or too small, too close to the cheekbone and not higher than the eyebrow. The frames should fit the face well, and not be wider than the face itself. In general, the smaller the frames the easier it is for a child to forget about them, and not mind wearing them. However, they need to be large enough so that your child can see easily in all directions. Parents should resist any urge to buy glasses that are a bit large for their children to grow into.The material of the lens needs to be impact resistant and light, and the frames should ideally be flexible. Lenses made out of polycarbonate material are ideal for children’s glasses, and frames made out of titanium are a good choice.

At what age can my child wear contact lenses?

Contact lenses are used by four million American children under the age of 18. A child’s maturity and responsibility are bigger factors in contact lens success more than age alone. New contact lens breakthroughs such as single use disposable contact lenses have made it realistic to fit patients as young as 8 or 9 in contact lenses.

Should a child limit screen time?

Kids and teens age 8 to 18 spend an average of more than seven hours a day looking at screens. The American Heart association recommends parents limit screen time for kids to a maximum of just two hours per day. For younger children, age 2 to 5, the recommended limit is one hour per day.

Are there any lens coatings that are recommended for children?

Anti-reflective coating helps eliminate glare from both the front and back surface of eyeglass lenses. AR coating is highly recommended for polycarbonate lenses that are prescribed for children which can reflex more light than other types of lens materials.